GPN2012.02.2910Q
Table of Contents

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

ý QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended February 29, 2012

OR

o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from             to             

Commission file number: 001-16111
GLOBAL PAYMENTS INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in charter)

Georgia
 
58-2567903
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
10 Glenlake Parkway, North Tower, Atlanta, Georgia
 
30328
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (770) 829-8000

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý   No ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes ý   No ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer ý                        Accelerated filer ¨
Non-accelerated filer ¨ (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Smaller reporting company ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
Yes ¨   No ý
The number of shares of the issuer’s common stock, no par value outstanding as of March 29, 2012 was 78,559,294.


Table of Contents

GLOBAL PAYMENTS INC.
FORM 10-Q
For the quarterly period ended February 29, 2012


TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
  
 
Page
PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION
ITEM 1.
  
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
 
  
 
 
 
  
 
  
 
  
 
 
ITEM 2.
 
ITEM 3.
  
ITEM 4.
  
PART II - OTHER INFORMATION
ITEM 1A.
 
ITEM 2.
 
ITEM 6.
  
SIGNATURES    



2

Table of Contents

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1. Financial Statements

GLOBAL PAYMENTS INC.
UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
(in thousands, except per share data)
 
 
Three Months Ended
 
February 29, 2012
 
February 28, 2011
Revenues    
$
533,539

 
$
456,382

Operating expenses:


 


Cost of service    
194,218

 
168,332

Sales, general and administrative
246,973

 
209,851

 
441,191

 
378,183

Operating income    
92,348

 
78,199

Other income (expense):
 
 
 
Interest and other income    
2,368

 
1,631

Interest and other expense    
(3,698
)
 
(4,315
)
 
(1,330
)
 
(2,684
)
Income from continuing operations before income taxes    
91,018

 
75,515

Provision for income taxes    
(25,328
)
 
(20,962
)
Income from continuing operations    
65,690

 
54,553

Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax

 
(430
)
Net income including noncontrolling interests    
65,690

 
54,123

Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests, net of income tax provision of $771 and $644, respectively
(7,770
)
 
(6,334
)
Net income attributable to Global Payments
$
57,920

 
$
47,789

Amounts attributable to Global Payments:
 
 
 
Income from continuing operations    
$
57,920

 
$
48,219

Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax

 
(430
)
Net income attributable to Global Payments
$
57,920

 
$
47,789

Basic earnings per share attributable to Global Payments:
 
 
 
Income from continuing operations
$
0.74

 
$
0.60

Loss from discontinued operations

 

Net income attributable to Global Payments    
$
0.74

 
$
0.60

Diluted earnings per share attributable to Global Payments:
 
 
 
Income from continuing operations
$
0.73

 
$
0.60

Loss from discontinued operations

 
(0.01
)
Net income attributable to Global Payments    
$
0.73

 
$
0.59

Dividends per share
$
0.02

 
$
0.02

See Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements.



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GLOBAL PAYMENTS INC.
UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
(in thousands, except per share data)
 
 
Nine Months Ended
 
February 29, 2012
 
February 28, 2011
Revenues    
$
1,606,815

 
$
1,340,047

Operating expenses:
 
 
 
Cost of service    
571,685

 
473,578

Sales, general and administrative
737,593

 
623,019

 
1,309,278

 
1,096,597

Operating income    
297,537

 
243,450

Other income (expense):
 
 
 
Interest and other income    
7,128

 
7,239

Interest and other expense    
(12,663
)
 
(13,455
)
 
(5,535
)
 
(6,216
)
Income from continuing operations before income taxes    
292,002

 
237,234

Provision for income taxes    
(86,082
)
 
(70,489
)
Income from continuing operations    
205,920

 
166,745

Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax

 
(946
)
Net income including noncontrolling interests    
205,920

 
165,799

Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests, net of income tax provision of $3,709 and $1,949, respectively
(22,845
)
 
(15,138
)
Net income attributable to Global Payments
$
183,075

 
$
150,661

Amounts attributable to Global Payments:
 
 
 
Income from continuing operations    
$
183,075

 
$
151,607

Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax

 
(946
)
Net income attributable to Global Payments
$
183,075

 
$
150,661

Basic earnings per share attributable to Global Payments:
 
 
 
Income from continuing operations
$
2.32

 
$
1.90

Loss from discontinued operations

 
(0.01
)
Net income attributable to Global Payments    
$
2.32

 
$
1.89

Diluted earnings per share attributable to Global Payments:
 
 
 
Income from continuing operations
$
2.30

 
$
1.89

Loss from discontinued operations

 
(0.02
)
Net income attributable to Global Payments    
$
2.30

 
$
1.87

Dividends per share
$
0.06

 
$
0.06

See Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements.

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GLOBAL PAYMENTS INC.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(in thousands, except share data)
 
February 29, 2012
 
May 31, 2011
 
(Unaudited)
 
 
ASSETS
 
  
 

Current assets:
 
  
 

Cash and cash equivalents    
$
735,733

  
$
1,354,285

Accounts receivable, net of allowances for doubtful accounts of $424 and $472, respectively
156,038

  
166,540

Claims receivable, net of allowances for losses of $4,417 and $3,870, respectively
1,153

  
914

Settlement processing assets    
179,515

  
280,359

Inventory
12,380

  
7,640

Deferred income taxes    
3,943

  
2,946

Prepaid expenses and other current assets    
37,737

  
35,291

Total current assets    
1,126,499

  
1,847,975

Goodwill    
760,972

  
779,637

Other intangible assets, net of accumulated amortization of $230,173 and $197,066, respectively
318,843

  
341,500

Property and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation of $176,696 and $147,670, respectively
288,428

  
256,301

Deferred income taxes    
98,585

 
104,140

Other    
23,644

  
20,978

Total assets    
$
2,616,971

  
$
3,350,531

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
 
  
 
Current liabilities:
 
  
 
Lines of credit    
$
215,716

 
$
270,745

Current portion of long-term debt
82,505

 
85,802

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities    
213,613

  
241,578

Settlement processing obligations    
221,247

 
838,565

Income taxes payable    
19,289

 
7,674

Total current liabilities    
752,370

  
1,444,364

Long-term debt
177,846

 
268,217

Deferred income taxes    
120,748

  
116,432

Other long-term liabilities    
56,803

  
49,843

Total liabilities    
1,107,767

  
1,878,856

Commitments and contingencies (See Note 11)


  


Redeemable noncontrolling interest        
141,897

  
133,858

Equity:
 
  
 
Preferred stock, no par value; 5,000,000 shares authorized and none issued    

  

Common stock, no par value; 200,000,000 shares authorized; 78,545,273 and 80,334,781 issued and outstanding at February 29, 2012 and May 31, 2011, respectively (see Note 1)

  

Paid-in capital (see Note 1)
354,191

  
419,591

Retained earnings (see Note 1)
842,487

  
685,624

Accumulated other comprehensive income
33,299

  
79,320

Total Global Payments shareholders’ equity    
1,229,977

  
1,184,535

Noncontrolling interest    
137,330

 
153,282

Total equity    
1,367,307

 
1,337,817

Total liabilities and equity    
$
2,616,971

  
$
3,350,531

See Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

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GLOBAL PAYMENTS INC.
UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(in thousands)
 
Nine Months Ended
 
February 29, 2012
 
February 28, 2011
Cash flows from operating activities:
 
 
 
Net income including noncontrolling interests
$
205,920

 
$
165,799

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash used in operating activities:


 


Depreciation and amortization of property and equipment    
35,821

 
29,033

Amortization of acquired intangibles    
37,676

 
27,486

Share-based compensation expense
12,796

 
11,748

Provision for operating losses and bad debts    
18,833

 
15,301

Deferred income taxes    
5,858

 
3,639

Loss on disposal of discontinued operations, non-cash

 
602

Other, net    
(949
)
 
(3,362
)
Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of the effects of acquisitions:


 


Accounts receivable    
10,502

 
(5,836
)
Claims receivable    
(11,744
)
 
(11,534
)
Settlement processing assets and obligations, net    
(523,802
)
 
444,174

Inventory    
(4,773
)
 
(69
)
Prepaid expenses and other assets    
(2,388
)
 
(7,997
)
Accounts payable and other accrued liabilities    
(22,211
)
 
45,182

Income taxes payable    
11,615

 
19,125

Net cash (used in) provided by operating activities
(226,846
)
 
733,291

Cash flows from investing activities:
 
 
 
Business, intangible and other asset acquisitions, net of cash acquired
(44,245
)
 
(167,775
)
Capital expenditures    
(71,084
)
 
(77,095
)
Preliminary settlement of working capital adjustments from disposition of business

 
(1,921
)
Net decrease in financing receivables    
1,862

 
1,514

Net cash used in investing activities    
(113,467
)
 
(245,277
)
Cash flows from financing activities:
 
 
 
Net (payments) borrowings on lines of credit
(55,029
)
 
109,774

Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt
71,374

 
202,155

Principal payments under long-term debt
(162,482
)
 
(248,996
)
Proceeds from stock issued under employee stock plans
9,630

 
12,072

Common stock repurchased - share based compensation plans
(4,847
)
 

Repurchase of common stock    
(99,604
)
 
(14,900
)
Tax benefit from employee share-based compensation    
2,036

 
1,335

Distributions to noncontrolling interest    
(24,334
)
 
(6,650
)
Dividends paid    
(4,740
)
 
(4,782
)
Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities
(267,996
)
 
50,008

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash    
(10,243
)
 
21,097

(Decrease) Increase in cash and cash equivalents
(618,552
)
 
559,119

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of the period    
1,354,285

 
769,946

Cash and cash equivalents, end of the period    
$
735,733

 
$
1,329,065

See Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements

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GLOBAL PAYMENTS INC.
UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY

 
(in thousands, except per share data)


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Number  of Shares 
 
Paid-in Capital 
Treasury Stock
Retained Earnings 
 
Currency Translation Adjustments
 
Minimum Pension Liability
 
Total Global Payments
Shareholders’ Equity
 
 
Noncontrolling Interest
 
Total
Equity
Balance at May 31, 2011, as previously reported
80,335

 
$
502,993

$
(112,980
)
$
715,202

 
$
82,159

 
$
(2,839
)
 
$
1,184,535

 
$
153,282

 
$
1,337,817

Retrospective adjustment for the correction of an error (see Note 1)
 
 
(112,980
)
112,980


 

 

 

 

 

Retrospective adjustment for the change in accounting method for the retirement of repurchased shares (see Note 1)
 
 
29,578


(29,578
)
 

 

 

 

 

Balance at May 31, 2011, as adjusted
 
 
419,591


685,624

 
82,159

 
(2,839
)
 
1,184,535

 
153,282

 
1,337,817

Comprehensive income:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income including noncontrolling interests
 
 
 
 
183,075

 
 
 
 
 
183,075

 
13,150

 
196,225

Foreign currency translation adjustment, net of tax of $783
 
 
 
 
 
 
(46,021
)
 
 
 
(46,021
)
 
(12,492
)
 
(58,513
)
Total comprehensive income
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
137,054

 
658

 
137,712

Stock issued under employee stock plans, net
500

 
4,783

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4,783

 
 
 
4,783

Tax benefit from employee share-based compensation, net
 
 
2,036

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2,036

 
 
 
2,036

Share-based compensation expense
 
 
12,796

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12,796

 
 
 
12,796

Distributions to noncontrolling interest
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
(16,610
)
 
(16,610
)
Redeemable noncontrolling interest valuation adjustment
 
 
 
 
(6,883
)
 
 
 
 
 
(6,883
)
 
 
 
(6,883
)
Repurchase of common stock (see Note 1)
(2,290
)
 
(85,015
)
 
(14,589
)
 
 
 
 
 
(99,604
)
 
 
 
(99,604
)
Dividends paid ($0.06 per share)
 
 
 
 
(4,740
)
 
 
 
 
 
(4,740
)
 
 
 
(4,740
)
Balance at February 29, 2012
78,545

 
$
354,191

$

$
842,487

 
$
36,138

 
$
(2,839
)
 
$
1,229,977

 
$
137,330

 
$
1,367,307


See Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements.


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GLOBAL PAYMENTS INC.
UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY

 
(in thousands, except per share data)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Number  of Shares 
 
Paid-in Capital 
Treasury Stock
Retained Earnings 
 
Currency Translation Adjustments
 
Minimum Pension Liability
 
Total Global Payments
Shareholders’ Equity
 
 
Noncontrolling Interest
 
Total
Equity
Balance at May 31, 2010, as previously reported
79,646

 
$
460,747

(100,000
)
$
544,772

 
$
(41,306
)
 
$
(2,949
)
 
$
861,264

 
$
10,253

 
$
871,517

Retrospective adjustment for the correction of an error (see Note 1)
 
 
(100,000
)
100,000


 

 

 

 

 

Retrospective adjustment for the change in accounting method for the retirement of repurchased shares (see Note 1)
 
 
29,578


(29,578
)
 

 

 

 

 

Balance at May 31, 2010, as adjusted
 
 
390,325


515,194

 
(41,306
)
 
(2,949
)
 
861,264

 
10,253

 
871,517

Comprehensive income:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income including noncontrolling interests
 
 
 
 
150,661

 
 
 
 
 
150,661

 
6,720

 
157,381

Foreign currency translation adjustment, net of tax of $(6,630)
 
 
 
 
 
 
93,538

 
 
 
93,538

 
 
 
93,538

Total comprehensive income
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
244,199

 
6,720

 
250,919

Stock issued under employee stock plans, net
765

 
12,072

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12,072

 
 
 
12,072

Tax benefit from employee share-based compensation, net
 
 
190

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
190

 
 
 
190

Share-based compensation expense
 
 
11,748

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11,748

 
 
 
11,748

Noncontrolling interest in business acquisitions
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
132,784

 
132,784

Distributions to noncontrolling interest
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
(6,650
)
 
(6,650
)
Redeemable noncontrolling interests valuation adjustment
 
 
 
 
(15,469
)
 
 
 
 
 
(15,469
)
 
 
 
(15,469
)
Repurchase of common stock (see Note 1)
(345
)
 
(12,980
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(12,980
)
 
 
 
(12,980
)
Dividends paid ($0.06 per share)
 
 
 
 
(4,782
)
 
 
 
 
 
(4,782
)
 
 
 
(4,782
)
Balance at February 28, 2011
80,066

 
$
401,355


$
645,604

 
$
52,232

 
$
(2,949
)
 
$
1,096,242

 
$
143,107

 
$
1,239,349



See Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements.


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NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
NOTE 1—SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
 
Business, consolidation and presentation— Global Payments Inc. is a high-volume processor of electronic transactions for merchants, multinational corporations, financial institutions, consumers, government agencies and other business and non-profit business enterprises to facilitate payments to purchase goods and services or further other economic goals. Our role is to serve as an intermediary in the exchange of information and funds that must occur between parties so that a transaction can be completed. We were incorporated in Georgia as Global Payments Inc. in September 2000 and we spun-off from our former parent company on January 31, 2001. Including our time as part of our former parent company, we have been in business since 1967.
 
These unaudited consolidated financial statements include our accounts and those of our majority-owned subsidiaries and all intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated. These unaudited consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States ("GAAP") for interim financial information and with Rule 10-01 of Regulation S-X.

In the opinion of our management, all known adjustments necessary for a fair presentation of the results of the interim periods have been made.  These adjustments consist of normal recurring accruals and estimates that impact the carrying value of assets and liabilities.  We suggest that these financial statements be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in our Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended May 31, 2011.

Use of estimatesThe preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make certain estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, as well as the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reported period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Correction of an error and change in accounting principle During the three months ended August 31, 2011 we determined that our presentation of repurchased shares as a separate component of shareholders' equity ("Treasury stock") in previously issued financial statements was at variance with Georgia incorporation law. As such, our shares repurchased during fiscal year 2010 and the first quarter of fiscal 2011 should have been accounted for as constructively retired, and the cost of repurchased shares should have been charged to paid-in capital in accordance with our accounting policy at that time. As a result of this error, our previously reported balances of treasury stock and paid-in capital as of May 31, 2011 and 2010 were misstated. To correct this error we have restated our May 31, 2011 treasury stock and paid-in capital balances, including an adjustment of $13.0 million for the nine months ended February 28, 2011. This adjustment is reflected in our consolidated statements of changes in equity by eliminating treasury stock and reclassifying this balance to paid-in capital. The May 31, 2011 treasury stock balance of $113.0 million has been reclassified to reduce paid-in capital by $113.0 million. The May 31, 2010 treasury stock balance of $100.0 million has been reclassified to reduce paid-in capital by $100.0 million. The effect of these misstatements was limited to treasury stock and paid-in capital.

Effective June 1, 2011, we elected to change our method of accounting for the retirement of repurchased shares. We previously accounted for the retirement of repurchased shares by charging the entire cost to paid-in capital. Our new method of accounting allocates the cost of repurchased and retired shares between paid-in capital and retained earnings. We believe that this method is preferable because it more accurately reflects our paid-in capital balances by allocating the cost of the shares repurchased and retired to paid-in capital in proportion to paid-in capital associated with the original issuance of said shares. We reflected the application of this new accounting method retrospectively by adjusting prior periods. This change is limited to an increase to the beginning balance of paid-in capital and a decrease to beginning balance of retained earnings of $29.6 million at May 31, 2011 and 2010 and is reflected in our consolidated balance sheets and statements of changes in equity.

Revenue recognition Our two merchant services segments primarily include processing solutions for credit cards, debit cards, and check-related services. Revenue is recognized as such services are performed. Revenue for processing services provided directly to merchants is recorded net of interchange fees charged by card issuing banks. The majority of our business model provides payment products and services directly to merchants as our end customers. We also provide similar products and services to financial institutions and a limited number of Independent Sales Organizations (ISOs) that, in turn, resell our products and services, in which case, the financial institutions and select ISOs are our end customers. The majority of merchant services revenue is generated on services priced as a percentage of transaction value or a specified fee per transaction, depending on card type. We also charge other fees based

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on specific services that are unrelated to the number of transactions or the transaction value. Revenue from credit cards and signature debit cards, which are only a U.S. based card type, is generally based on a percentage of transaction value along with other related fees, while revenue from PIN debit cards is typically based on a fee per transaction.

Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand and all liquid investments with an initial maturity of three months or less when purchased. Cash and cash equivalents include reserve funds collected from our merchants that serve as collateral (“Merchant Reserves”) to minimize contingent liabilities associated with any losses that may occur under the merchant agreement. We record a corresponding liability in settlement processing assets and settlement processing obligations in our consolidated balance sheet. While this cash is not restricted in its use, we believe that designating this cash to collateralize Merchant Reserves strengthens our fiduciary standing with our member sponsors and is in accordance with guidelines set by the card networks. As of February 29, 2012 and May 31, 2011, our cash and cash equivalents included $330.9 million and $271.4 million, respectively, related to Merchant Reserves.

Our cash and cash equivalents include settlement related cash balances. Settlement related cash balances represent surplus funds that we hold on behalf of our member sponsors when the incoming amount from the card networks precedes the member sponsors’ funding obligation to the merchant. Settlement related cash balances are not restricted; however, these funds are generally paid out in satisfaction of settlement processing obligations the following day. Please see Settlement processing assets and obligations below for further information.

InventoryInventory, which includes electronic point of sale terminals, automated teller machines, and related peripheral equipment, is stated at the lower of cost or fair value. Cost is determined by using the average cost method.
 
Settlement processing assets and obligationsWe are designated as a Merchant Service Provider by MasterCard and an Independent Sales Organization by Visa. These designations are dependent upon member clearing banks (“Member”) sponsoring us and our adherence to the standards of the networks. We have five primary financial institution sponsors in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Spain, Malta, the Asia-Pacific region and the Russian Federation with whom we have sponsorship or depository and clearing agreements. These agreements allow us to route transactions under the member banks’ control and identification numbers to clear credit card transactions through Visa and MasterCard. Visa and MasterCard set the standards with which we must comply. Certain of the member financial institutions of Visa and MasterCard are our competitors. In certain markets, we are members in various payment networks, allowing us to process and fund transactions without third-party sponsorship.

We also provide credit card transaction processing for Discover Financial Services or Discover Card (“Discover”) and are designated as an acquirer by Discover. Our agreement with Discover allows us to acquire, process and fund transactions directly through Discover’s network without the need of a financial institution sponsor. Otherwise, we process Discover transactions similarly to how we process MasterCard and Visa transactions. Discover publishes acquirer operating regulations, with which we must comply. We use our Members to assist in funding merchants for Discover transactions.

Funds settlement refers to the process of transferring funds for sales and credits between card issuers and merchants. Depending on the type of transaction, either the credit card interchange system or the debit network is used to transfer the information and funds between the Member and card issuer to complete the link between merchants and card issuers.

For transactions processed on our systems, we use our internal network telecommunication infrastructure to provide funding instructions to the Members who in turn fund the merchants. In certain of our markets, merchant funding primarily occurs after the Member receives the funds from the card issuer through the card networks creating a net settlement obligation on our balance sheet. In our other markets, the Member funds the merchants before the Member receives the net settlement funds from the card networks, creating a net settlement asset on our balance sheet. In certain markets in the Asia-Pacific region and Malta, the Member provides the payment processing operations and related support services on our behalf under a transition services agreement. In such instances, we do not reflect the related settlement processing assets and obligations in our consolidated balance sheet. The Member will continue to provide these operations and services until the integration to our platform is completed. After our integration, the Member will continue to provide funds settlement services similar to the functions performed by our Members in other markets at which point the related settlement assets and obligations will be reflected in our consolidated balance sheet.

Timing differences, interchange expense, Merchant Reserves and exception items cause differences between the amount the Member receives from the card networks and the amount funded to the merchants. The standards of the card networks restrict us from performing funds settlement or accessing merchant settlement funds, and, instead, require that these funds be in the possession

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of the Member until the merchant is funded. However, in practice and in accordance with the terms of our sponsorship agreements with our Members, we generally follow a net settlement process whereby, if the incoming amount from the card networks precedes the Member’s funding obligation to the merchant, we temporarily hold the surplus on behalf of the Member in our account at the Member bank and record a corresponding liability. Conversely, if the Member’s funding obligation to the merchant precedes the incoming amount from the card networks, the amount of the Member’s net receivable position is either subsequently advanced to the Member by us or the Member satisfies this obligation with its own funds. If the Member uses its own funds, the Member assesses a funding cost, which is included in interest and other expense on the accompanying consolidated statements of income. Each participant in the transaction process receives compensation for its services.

Settlement processing assets and obligations represent intermediary balances arising in our settlement process for direct merchants. Settlement processing assets consist primarily of (i) our receivable from merchants for the portion of the discount fee related to reimbursement of the interchange expense (“Interchange reimbursement”), (ii) our receivable from the Members for transactions we have funded merchants on behalf of the Members in advance of receipt of card association funding (“Receivable from Members”), (iii) our receivable from the card networks for transactions processed on behalf of merchants where we are a Member of that particular network (“Receivable from networks”), and (iv) exception items, such as customer chargeback amounts receivable from merchants (“Exception items”), all of which are reported net of (iv) Merchant Reserves held to minimize contingent liabilities associated with charges properly reversed by a cardholder (“Merchant Reserves”). Settlement processing obligations consist primarily of (i) Interchange reimbursement, (ii) our receivable from the Members for transactions for which we have funded merchants on behalf of the Members prior to the receipt of funding from the Members ("Receivable from Members") (iii) our liability to the Members for transactions for which we have received funding from the Members but have not funded merchants on behalf of the Members (“Liability to Members”), (iv) our liability to merchants for transactions that have been processed but not yet funded where we are a Member of that particular network (“Liability to merchants”), (v) Exception items, (vi) Merchant Reserves, (vii) the reserve for operating losses (see Reserve for operating losses below), and (viii) the reserve for sales allowances. In cases in which the Member uses its own funds to satisfy a funding obligation to merchants that precedes the incoming amount from the card network, we reflect the amount of this funding as a component of “Liability to Members.”

A summary of these amounts as of February 29, 2012 and May 31, 2011 is as follows:

 
February 29, 2012
 
May 31,
2011
Settlement processing assets:
(in thousands)
Interchange reimbursement
$
23,717

 
$
72,022

Receivable from Members
55,262

 
142,117

Receivable from networks
101,005

 
124,980

Exception items
1,046

 
4,456

Merchant Reserves
(1,515
)
 
(63,216
)
   Total
$
179,515

 
$
280,359

 
.

 
 
Settlement processing obligations:
 
 
 
Interchange reimbursement
$
194,587

 
$
212,069

Receivable from (liability to) Members
19,740

 
(718,650
)
Liability to merchants
(113,291
)
 
(129,806
)
Exception items
12,087

 
12,394

Merchant Reserves
(329,395
)
 
(208,195
)
Reserve for operating losses
(3,471
)
 
(3,102
)
Reserves for sales allowances
(1,504
)
 
(3,275
)
   Total
$
(221,247
)
 
$
(838,565
)

Reserve for operating losses As a part of our merchant credit and debit card processing and check guarantee services, we experience merchant losses and check guarantee losses, which are collectively referred to as “operating losses.”


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Our credit card processing merchant customers are liable for any charges or losses that occur under the merchant agreement. In the event, however, that we are not able to collect such amount from the merchants, due to merchant fraud, insolvency, bankruptcy or any other merchant-related reason, we may be liable for any such losses based on our merchant agreement. We require cash deposits (merchant reserves), guarantees, letters of credit, and other types of collateral by certain merchants to minimize any such contingent liability. We also utilize a number of systems and procedures to manage merchant risk. We have, however, historically experienced losses due to merchant defaults.
  
We account for our potential liability for the full amount of the operating losses discussed above as guarantees. We estimate the fair value of these guarantees by adding a fair value margin to our estimate of losses. This estimate of losses is comprised of estimated incurred losses and a projection of future losses. Estimated incurred loss accruals are recorded when it is probable that we have incurred a loss and the loss is reasonably estimable. These losses typically result from chargebacks related to merchant bankruptcies, closures, or fraud. Estimated incurred losses are calculated at the merchant level based on chargebacks received to date, processed volume, and historical chargeback ratios. The estimate is reduced for any collateral that we hold. Accruals for estimated incurred losses are evaluated periodically and adjusted as appropriate based on actual loss experience. Our projection of future losses is based on an assumed percentage of our direct merchant credit card and signature debit card sales volumes processed, or processed volume. Historically, this estimation process has been materially accurate.

As of February 29, 2012 and May 31, 2011, $3.5 million and $3.1 million, respectively, have been recorded to reflect the fair value of guarantees associated with merchant card processing. These amounts are included in settlement processing obligations in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. The expense associated with the fair value of the guarantees of customer chargebacks is included in cost of service in the accompanying consolidated statements of income. For the three months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011, we recorded such expenses in the amounts of $2.1 million and $1.6 million, respectively. For the nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011, we recorded such expenses in the amounts of $7.3 million and $3.7 million, respectively.
 
In our check guarantee service offering, we charge our merchants a percentage of the gross amount of the check and guarantee payment of the check to the merchant in the event the check is not honored by the checkwriter’s bank in accordance with the merchant’s agreement with us. The fair value of the check guarantee approximates cost and is equal to the fee charged for the guarantee service, and we defer this fee revenue until the guarantee is satisfied. We have the right to collect the full amount of the check from the checkwriter but have not historically recovered 100% of the guaranteed checks. Our check guarantee loss reserve is based on historical and projected loss experiences. As of February 29, 2012 and May 31, 2011, we have a check guarantee loss reserve of $4.4 million and $3.9 million, respectively, which is included in net claims receivable in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. For the three months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011, we recorded expenses of $3.7 million and $3.5 million, respectively. For the nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011, we recorded expenses of $11.5 million and $11.3 million, respectively, which are included in cost of service in the accompanying consolidated statements of income. The estimated check returns and recovery amounts are subject to the risk that actual amounts returned and recovered in the future may differ significantly from estimates used in calculating the receivable valuation allowance.

As the potential for merchants’ failure to settle individual reversed charges from consumers in our merchant credit card processing offering and the timing of individual checks clearing the checkwriters’ banks in our check guarantee offering are not predictable, it is not practicable to calculate the maximum amounts for which we could be liable under the guarantees issued under the merchant card processing and check guarantee service offerings. It is not practicable to estimate the extent to which merchant collateral or subsequent collections of dishonored checks, respectively, would offset these exposures due to these same uncertainties.

Property and equipment— Property and equipment are stated at amortized cost. Depreciation and amortization are calculated using the straight-line method, except for certain technology assets discussed below. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the lesser of the remaining term of the lease or the useful life of the asset. Maintenance and repairs are charged to operations as incurred.

We develop software that is used in providing processing services to customers. Capitalization of internally developed software, primarily associated with operating platforms, occurs when we have completed the preliminary project stage, management authorizes the project, management commits to funding the project, it is probable the project will be completed and the project will be used to perform the function intended. The preliminary project stage consists of the conceptual formulation of alternatives, the evaluation of alternatives, the determination of existence of needed technology and the final selection of alternatives. Costs incurred prior to the completion of the preliminary project stage are expensed as incurred.

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During fiscal 2010, we placed into service $54.9 million of hardware and software associated with our next generation technology processing platform, referred to as G2. The vision for this platform is to serve as a front-end operating environment for merchant processing and is intended to replace a number of legacy platforms that have higher cost structures. Depreciation and amortization associated with these costs is calculated based on transactions expected to be processed over the life of the platform. We believe that this method is more representative of the platform’s use than the straight-line method. We are currently processing transactions on our G2 platform in seven markets in our Asia-Pacific region and for a limited number of U.S. merchants. As these markets represent a small percentage of our overall transactions, depreciation and amortization related to our G2 platform for the nine months ended February 29, 2012 was not significant. Depreciation and amortization expense will increase as we complete migrations of other markets to the G2 platform.
 
Goodwill and other intangible assets We completed our most recent annual goodwill impairment test as of January 1, 2012 and determined that the fair value of each of our reporting units were substantially in excess of the carrying value. No events or changes in circumstances have occurred since the date of our most recent annual impairment test that would more likely than not reduce the fair value of a reporting unit below its carrying amount.

Goodwill is tested for impairment at the reporting unit level, and the impairment test consists of two steps. In the first step the reporting unit’s carrying amount, including goodwill, is compared to its fair value. If the carrying amount of the reporting unit is greater than its fair value, goodwill is considered impaired and step two must be performed. Step two measures the impairment loss by comparing the implied fair value of reporting unit goodwill with the carrying amount of that goodwill. The implied fair value of goodwill is determined by allocating the fair value of the reporting unit to all the assets and liabilities of that unit (including unrecognized intangibles) as if the reporting unit had been acquired in a business combination. The excess of fair value over the amounts allocated to the assets and liabilities of the reporting unit is the implied fair value of goodwill. The excess of the carrying amount over the implied fair value is the impairment loss.

We have six reporting units: North America Merchant Services, UK Merchant Services, Asia Pacific Merchant Services, Central and Eastern Europe Merchant Services, Russia Merchant Services and Spain Merchant Services. We estimate the fair value of our reporting units using a combination of the income approach and the market approach. The income approach utilizes a discounted cash flow model incorporating management’s expectations for future revenue, operating expenses, EBITDA, capital expenditures and an anticipated tax rate. We discount the related cash flow forecasts using our estimated weighted-average cost of capital for each reporting unit at the date of valuation. The market approach utilizes comparative market multiples in the valuation estimate. Multiples are derived by relating the value of guideline companies, based on either the market price of publicly traded shares or the prices of companies being acquired in the marketplace, to various measures of their earnings and cash flow. Such multiples are then applied to the historical and projected earnings and cash flow of the reporting unit in developing the valuation estimate.

Preparation of forecasts and the selection of the discount rates involve significant judgments about expected future business performance and general market conditions. Significant changes in our forecasts, the discount rates selected or the weighting of the income and market approach could affect the estimated fair value of one or more of our reporting units and could result in a goodwill impairment charge in a future period.

Other intangible assets primarily represent customer-related intangible assets (such as customer lists and merchant contracts), contract-based intangible assets (such as non-compete agreements, referral agreements and processing rights), and trademarks associated with acquisitions. Customer-related intangible assets, contract-based intangible assets and certain trademarks are amortized over their estimated useful lives of up to 30 years. The useful lives for customer-related intangible assets are determined based primarily on forecasted cash flows, which include estimates for the revenues, expenses, and customer attrition associated with the assets. The useful lives of contract-based intangible assets are equal to the terms of the agreements. The useful lives of amortizable trademarks are based on our plans to phase out the trademarks in the applicable markets.

Amortization for most of our customer-related intangible assets is calculated using an accelerated method. In determining amortization expense under our accelerated method for any given period, we calculate the expected cash flows for that period that were used in determining the acquired value of the asset and divide that amount by the expected total cash flows over the estimated life of the asset. We multiply that percentage by the initial carrying value of the asset to arrive at the amortization expense for that period. If the cash flow patterns that we experience are less favorable than our initial estimates, we will adjust the amortization schedule accordingly. These cash flow patterns are derived using certain assumptions and cost allocations due to a significant amount of asset interdependencies that exist in our business.

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Impairment of long-lived assetsWe regularly evaluate whether events and circumstances have occurred that indicate the carrying amount of property and equipment and finite-lived intangible assets may not be recoverable. When factors indicate that these long-lived assets should be evaluated for possible impairment, we assess the potential impairment by determining whether the carrying value of such long-lived assets will be recovered through the future undiscounted cash flows expected from use of the asset and its eventual disposition. If the carrying amount of the asset is determined not to be recoverable, a write-down to fair value is recorded. Fair values are determined based on quoted market values or discounted cash flow analyses as applicable. We regularly evaluate whether events and circumstances have occurred that indicate the useful lives of property and equipment and finite-life intangible assets may warrant revision. In our opinion, the carrying values of our long-lived assets, including property and equipment and finite-life intangible assets, were not impaired at February 29, 2012 and May 31, 2011.

Income taxesDeferred income taxes are determined based on the difference between the financial statement and tax bases of assets and liabilities using enacted tax laws and rates. A valuation allowance is provided when it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.

Our effective tax rate was 27.8% for the three months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011. Our effective tax rates were 29.5% and 29.7% for the nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011, respectively. The effective tax rates for the nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011 reflect adjustments to our UK deferred tax asset due to legislated enacted corporate tax rate reductions in the United Kingdom of 2% and 1%, respectively. Please see Note 5 – Income Tax for further information.

Fair value of financial instrumentsWe consider that the carrying amounts of our financial instruments, including cash and cash equivalents, receivables, lines of credit, accounts payable and accrued liabilities, approximate their fair value given the short-term nature of these items. Our term loans include variable interest rates based on the prime rate or London Interbank Offered Rate plus a margin based on our leverage position. At February 29, 2012, the carrying amount of our term loans approximates fair value. Our subsidiary in the Russian Federation has notes payable with interest rates ranging from 8.0% to 10.0% and maturity dates ranging from March 2012 through December 2016. At February 29, 2012, we believe the carrying amount of these notes approximates fair value. Please see Note 4 – Long-Term Debt and Credit Facilities for further information.

Financing receivablesOur subsidiary in the Russian Federation purchases Automated Teller Machines (ATMs) and leases those ATMs to our sponsor bank. We have determined these arrangements to be direct financing leases. Accordingly, we have $14.8 million and $18.9 million of financing receivables included in our February 29, 2012 and May 31, 2011 consolidated balance sheets, respectively.

There is an inherent risk that our customer may not pay the contractual balances due. We periodically review the financing receivables for credit losses and past due balances to determine whether an allowance should be recorded. Historically we have not had any credit losses or past due balances associated with these receivables, and therefore we do not have an allowance recorded. We have had no financing receivables modified as troubled debt restructurings nor have we had any purchases or sales of financing receivables.

Foreign currenciesWe have significant operations in a number of foreign subsidiaries whose functional currency is their local currency.  Gains and losses on transactions denominated in currencies other than the functional currencies are included in determining net income for the period.  For the three and nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011, our transaction gains and losses were insignificant.

The assets and liabilities of subsidiaries whose functional currency is a foreign currency are translated at the period-end rate of exchange. Income statement items are translated at the weighted average rates prevailing during the period. The resulting translation adjustment is recorded as a component of other comprehensive income and is included in equity. Translation gains and losses on intercompany balances of a long-term investment nature are also recorded as a component of other comprehensive income.

Earnings per shareBasic earnings per share is computed by dividing reported earnings available to common shareholders by the weighted average shares outstanding during the period. Earnings available to common shareholders are the same as reported net income attributable to Global Payments for all periods presented.
 
Diluted earnings per share is computed by dividing reported earnings available to common shareholders by the weighted

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average shares outstanding during the period and the impact of securities that would have a dilutive effect on earnings per share. All options with an exercise price less than the average market share price for the period are assumed to have a dilutive effect on earnings per share. The diluted share base for both the three months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011 excludes shares of 0.1 million related to stock options. The diluted share base for the nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011 excludes shares of 0.3 million and 0.7 million, respectively, related to stock options. These shares were not considered in computing diluted earnings per share because including them would have had an antidilutive effect. No additional securities were outstanding that could potentially dilute basic earnings per share.

The following table sets forth the computation of diluted weighted average shares outstanding for the three and nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011 (in thousands):

 
Three Months Ended
 
Nine Months Ended
 
February 29, 2012
 
February 28, 2011
 
February 29, 2012
 
February 28, 2011
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic weighted average shares outstanding    
78,421

 
79,897

 
78,937

 
79,711

Plus: dilutive effect of stock options and other share-based awards
644

 
836

 
574

 
702

Diluted weighted average shares outstanding    
79,065

 
80,733

 
79,511

 
80,413


New accounting pronouncements— From time to time, new accounting pronouncements are issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) or other standards setting bodies that are adopted by us as of the specified effective date. Unless otherwise discussed, our management believes that the impact of recently issued standards that are not yet effective will not have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements upon adoption.

In December 2011, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update ("ASU") 2011-12, "Deferral of the Effective Date for Amendments to the Presentation of Reclassifications of Items Out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income in Accounting Standards Update No 2011-05" ("ASU 2011-12"). The amendments in ASU 2011-12 defer the changes in ASU 2011-05 that relate to the presentation of reclassification adjustments out of accumulated other comprehensive income. See below for the provisions of ASU 2011-05.

In December 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-11, "Disclosures About Offsetting Assets and Liabilities" ("ASU 2011-11"). The amendments in ASU 2011-11 require entities to disclose information about offsetting and related arrangements to enable users of financial statements to understand the effect of those arrangements on an entity's financial position. The amendments require enhanced disclosures by requiring improved information about financial instruments and derivative instruments that are either (i) offset in accordance with current literature or (2) subject to an enforceable master netting arrangement or similar agreement, irrespective of whether they are offset in accordance with current literature. ASU 2011-11 is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning on or after January 1, 2013. This standard will become effective for us beginning June 2013. The disclosures required by ASU 2011-11 will be applied retrospectively for all comparative periods presented. We are currently evaluating the impact of ASU 2011-11 on our settlement processing assets and obligations disclosures.

In September 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-08, "Testing Goodwill for Impairment" ("ASU 2011-08"). The amendments in ASU 2011-08 will allow an entity to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is necessary to perform the two-step quantitative goodwill impairment test. Under these amendments, an entity would not be required to calculate the fair value of a reporting unit unless the entity determines, based on a qualitative assessment, that it is more likely than not that its fair value is less than its carrying amount. The amendments include a number of events and circumstances for an entity to consider in conducting the qualitative assessment. ASU 2011-08 is effective for annual and interim goodwill impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011. This standard will become effective for us beginning June 2012. Early adoption is permitted. We are currently evaluating the impact of ASU 2011-08 on our goodwill impairment testing process.

In June 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-05, “Presentation of Comprehensive Income” (“ASU 2011-05”). In accordance with ASU 2011-05, an entity has the option to present the total of comprehensive income, the components of net income, and the

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components of other comprehensive income either in a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. In both choices, an entity is required to present each component of net income along with total net income, each component of other comprehensive income along with a total for other comprehensive income, and a total amount for comprehensive income. ASU 2011-05 eliminates the option to present the components of other comprehensive income as part of the statement of changes in stockholders' equity. ASU 2011-05 does not change the items that must be reported in other comprehensive income or when an item of other comprehensive income must be reclassified to net income. ASU 2011-05 is effective retrospectively for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011. This standard will become effective for us beginning June 2012. We are currently evaluating the options provided in the standard for reporting comprehensive income.

In May 2011, the FASB issued ASU 2011-04, “Amendments to Achieve Common Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure Requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRS” (“ASU 2011-04”). The amendments in ASU 2011-04 result in common fair value measurement and disclosure requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRS. Consequently, ASU 2011-04 changes the wording used to describe many of the requirements in U.S. GAAP for measuring fair value and for disclosing information about fair value measurements. For many of the requirements, the FASB does not intend for the amendments in ASU 2011-04 to result in a change in the application of the requirements in FASB Accounting Standards Codification Topic 820. ASU 2011-04 is effective prospectively for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2011. This ASU will become effective for us beginning in the quarter ended May 31, 2012. We do not expect an impact on our consolidated financial statements.


NOTE 2—BUSINESS AND INTANGIBLE ASSET ACQUISITIONS

Fiscal 2012

Alfa-Bank

On December 5, 2011, we acquired the merchant acquiring business of Alfa-Bank ("Alfa"), the largest privately owned bank in Russia, for $14.1 million in cash. This acquisition has been recorded as a business combination, and the purchase price is allocated to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on their estimated fair values. The purchase price of Alfa was determined by analyzing the historical and prospective financial statements. The results of operations of this business were not significant to our consolidated results of operations and accordingly, we have not provided pro forma information relating to this acquisition.

The following table summarizes the preliminary purchase price allocation (in thousands):
Goodwill
$
3,021

Customer-related intangible assets
7,004

Fixed Assets
1,137

Other Assets
2,888

     Net assets acquired       
$
14,050


The customer-related intangible assets have estimated amortization periods of 10 years.

Malta

On December 30, 2011, we acquired a merchant acquiring business in Malta from HSBC Malta for $14.5 million in cash. This acquisition has been recorded as a business combination, and the purchase price is allocated to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on their estimated fair values. In conjunction with the acquisition, HSBC Malta agreed to a 10 year marketing alliance agreement in which HSBC Malta will refer customers to us for payment processing services in Malta and provide sponsorship into the card networks. The purchase price of our merchant acquiring business in Malta was determined by analyzing the historical and prospective financial statements. The results of operations of this business were not significant to our consolidated results of operations and accordingly, we have not provided pro forma information relating to this acquisition.

The following table summarizes the preliminary purchase price allocation (in thousands):

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Goodwill
$
6,341

Customer-related intangible assets
4,543

Contract-based intangible assets
2,796

Fixed assets
798

     Net assets acquired       
$
14,478


The goodwill associated with the acquisition is not deductible for tax purposes. The customer-related intangible assets have estimated amortization periods of 16 years. The contract-based intangible assets have estimated amortization periods of 10 years.

CyberSource

On January 31, 2012, we acquired the U.S. merchant portfolio of CyberSource from Visa for $14.9 million. The merchant portfolio has been classified as customer-related intangible assets with estimated amortization periods of 10 years.

Fiscal 2011

Comercia Global Payments Entidad de Pago, S.L.

On December 20, 2010, we acquired a 51% controlling financial interest in Comercia Global Payments Entidad de Pago, S.L. (“Comercia”), a newly formed company into which Caixa d’Estalvis i Pensions de Barcelona (“la Caixa”) contributed its merchant acquiring business in Spain. “la Caixa” owns the remaining 49% of Comercia. We formed Comercia with “la Caixa”, one of the largest retail banks in Spain, to provide merchant acquiring services to merchants in Spain. We purchased our share of Comercia for €125 million. The shareholders contributed a total of €6.4 million as initial capital to form Comercia. Our total investment in Comercia, including our 51% share of the initial capital was €128.3 million ($173.5 million as of the closing date). We manage the day-to-day operations of the corporation, control all major decisions and, accordingly, consolidate the corporation’s financial results for accounting purposes effective with the closing date. In conjunction with the acquisition, “la Caixa” agreed to a twenty year marketing alliance agreement in which “la Caixa” will refer customers to Comercia for payment processing services in Spain and provide sponsorship into the card networks. We funded the purchase with a combination of existing cash resources in Europe and borrowings on our Corporate Credit Facility. During fiscal 2011, we expensed acquisition costs of $1.0 million associated with this transaction. These costs were recorded in selling, general and administrative expenses in the accompanying consolidated statements of income. The revenues and earnings of Comercia from the date of acquisition through the end of fiscal 2011were not significant to our fiscal 2011 consolidated results of operations.

The purchase price of Comercia was determined by analyzing the historical and prospective financial statements. The results of operations of this business were not significant to our consolidated results of operations and accordingly, we have not provided pro forma information relating to this acquisition.

The following table summarizes the purchase price allocation (in thousands):
Goodwill       
$
147,535

Customer-related intangible assets    
96,100

Contract-based intangible assets    
54,141

Working capital, net    
8,476

Total assets acquired    
306,252

Non-controlling interest    
(132,738
)
     Net assets acquired       
$
173,514


The goodwill associated with the acquisition is deductible for tax purposes. The customer-related intangible assets have estimated amortization periods of 10 years. The contract-based intangible assets have estimated amortization periods of 20 years.

Other

During fiscal year 2011, we acquired contract-based and customer related intangible assets in our United States merchant

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services channel for $3.5 million. These intangible assets are being amortized on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives of 5 to 7 years.


NOTE 3—GOODWILL AND INTANGIBLE ASSETS

As of February 29, 2012 and May 31, 2011, goodwill and intangible assets consisted of the following:
 
 
February 29, 2012
 
May 31,
2011
 
(in thousands)
Goodwill    
$
760,972

 
$
779,637

Other intangible assets:


 


Customer-related intangible assets
$
469,668

 
$
457,226

Trademarks, finite life    
8,463

 
8,659

Contract-based intangible assets    
70,885

 
72,681

 
549,016

 
538,566

Less accumulated amortization on:
 
 
 
Customer-related intangible assets    
210,075

 
181,372

Trademarks    
4,769

 
4,138

Contract-based intangible assets
15,329

 
11,556

 
230,173

 
197,066

 
$
318,843

 
$
341,500


The following table discloses the changes in the carrying amount of goodwill for the nine months ended February 29, 2012 (in thousands):

 
North America merchant services
 
International merchant services
 



Total
 
(in thousands)
Balance at May 31, 2011    
$
217,422

 
$
562,215

 
$
779,637

Accumulated impairment losses

 

 

 
217,422

 
562,215

 
779,637

 
 
 
 
 
 
Goodwill acquired    

 
9,362

 
9,362

Effect of foreign currency translation    
(2,190
)
 
(25,837
)
 
(28,027
)
Balance at February 29, 2012
$
215,232

 
$
545,740

 
$
760,972



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NOTE 4—LONG-TERM DEBT AND CREDIT FACILITIES

Outstanding debt consisted of the following:
 
February 29,
2012
 
May 31,
2011
Lines of credit:
(in thousands)
Corporate Credit Facility - long-term
$
154,500

 
$
183,975

Short-term lines of credit:
 
 
 
United Kingdom Credit Facility
85,661

 
108,333

Hong Kong Credit Facility
74,400

 
73,554

Canada Credit Facility
5,800

 
18,725

Malaysia Credit Facility
10,343

 
17,743

Spain Credit Facility
15,096

 
17,646

Singapore Credit Facility
10,013

 
17,245

Philippines Credit Facility
6,354

 
9,736

Maldives Credit Facility
3,362

 
3,202

Macau Credit Facility
2,468

 
2,372

Sri Lanka Credit Facility
2,219

 
2,189

Total short-term lines of credit
215,716

 
270,745

Total lines of credit
370,216

 
454,720

Notes Payable
11,819

 
14,285

Term loans
94,032

 
155,759

Total debt
$
476,067

 
$
624,764

 
 
 
 
Current portion
$
298,221

 
$
356,547

Long-term debt
177,846

 
268,217

Total debt
$
476,067

 
$
624,764



Lines of Credit

The Corporate Credit Facility is available for general corporate purposes and to fund future strategic acquisitions. Our short-term line of credit facilities are used to fund settlement and provide a source of working capital. With certain of our credit facilities, the facility nets the amounts pre-funded to merchants against specific cash balances in local Global Payments accounts, which we characterize as cash and cash equivalents.  Therefore, the amounts reported in lines of credit, which represents the amounts pre-funded to merchants, may exceed the stated credit limit, when in fact the combined position is less than the credit limit. The total available incremental borrowings under our credit facilities at February 29, 2012 were $990.4 million, of which $445.5 million is available under our Corporate Credit Facility.

Term Loans

We have a five year unsecured $200.0 million term loan agreement with a syndicate of banks in the United States which we used to partially fund our HSBC Merchant Services LLP acquisition. The term loan expires in June 2013 and bears interest, at our election, at the prime rate or LIBOR, plus a leverage based margin. As of February 29, 2012 the interest rate on the term loan was 1.25%. The term loan calls for quarterly principal payments of $5.0 million beginning with the quarter ended August 31, 2008 and increasing to $10.0 million beginning with the quarter ended August 31, 2010 and $15.0 million beginning with the quarter ending August 31, 2011. As of February 29, 2012, the outstanding balance of the term loan was $75.0 million.


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We have a $300.0 million term loan agreement ($230.0 million and £43.5 million) with a syndicate of financial institutions. In December 2010, the entire balance of the United States dollar portion of the term loan was repaid by a borrowing on the Corporate Credit Facility, and the facility terms were amended. The term loan expires in July 2012 and has a variable interest rate based on LIBOR plus a leverage based margin.  As of February 29, 2012, the interest rate on the remaining British Pound Sterling portion of the term loan was 2.12%. The term loan requires quarterly principal payments of £2.2 million beginning with the quarter ended August 31, 2009 and increasing to £3.3 million beginning with the quarter ended August 31, 2010. As of February 29, 2012, the outstanding balance of this term loan was $19.0 million (£12.0 million).

Notes Payable

UCS, our subsidiary in the Russian Federation, has notes payable with a total outstanding balance of approximately $11.8 million at February 29, 2012. These notes have fixed interest rates ranging from 8.0% to 10.0% with maturity dates ranging from March 2012 through December 2016.

Compliance with Covenants

There are certain financial and non-financial covenants contained in our various credit facilities and term loans. Our term loan agreements include financial covenants requiring a leverage ratio no greater than 3.25 to 1.00 and a fixed charge coverage ratio no less than 2.50 to 1.00. We complied with these covenants as of and for the nine months ended February 29, 2012.

NOTE 5—INCOME TAX

We have a deferred tax asset of $95.1 million at February 29, 2012 primarily associated with the purchase of the remaining 49% interest in HSBC Merchant Services LLP ("UK deferred tax asset").

Our effective tax rate was 27.8% for the three months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011. Our effective tax rates were 29.5% and 29.7% for the nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011, respectively. The effective tax rates for the nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011 reflect adjustments to our UK deferred tax asset due to legislated enacted corporate tax rate reductions in the United Kingdom of 2% and 1%, respectively.

As of February 29, 2012 and May 31, 2011, other long-term liabilities included liabilities for unrecognized income tax benefits of $44.3 million and $37.2 million, respectively. During the three and nine months ended February 29, 2012, we recognized additional liabilities of $3.3 million and $7.1 million, respectively, for unrecognized income tax benefits. During both the nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011, amounts recorded for accrued interest and penalty expense related to the unrecognized income tax benefits were insignificant. We expect the amounts of unrecognized tax benefits to increase by approximately $11 million within the next twelve months.

We conduct business globally and file income tax returns in the United States federal jurisdiction and various state and foreign jurisdictions. In the normal course of business, we are subject to examination by taxing authorities throughout the world, including such major jurisdictions as the United States, United Kingdom and Canada. With few exceptions, we are no longer subject to income tax examinations for years ended May 31, 2005 and prior.

NOTE 6—SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

On August 8, 2011, our Board of Directors approved a share repurchase program that authorized the purchase of up to $100.0 million of Global Payments’ stock in the open market at the current market price, subject to market conditions, business opportunities, and other factors. Under this authorization, we repurchased 2,290,059 shares of our common stock at a cost of $99.6 million, or an average of $43.49 per share, including commissions during fiscal 2012. This share repurchase program has concluded.

During the first quarter of fiscal 2011, we used the $13.0 million remaining under the authorization from our original share repurchase program initiated during fiscal 2007 to repurchase 344,847 shares of our common stock a cost of $13.0 million, or an average of $37.64 per share, including commissions.

NOTE 7—SHARE-BASED AWARDS AND OPTIONS

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As of February 29, 2012, we have awards outstanding under four share-based employee compensation plans. The fair value of share-based awards is amortized as compensation expense on a straight-line basis over the vesting period.

Non-qualified stock options and restricted stock have been granted to officers, key employees and directors under the Global Payments Inc. 2000 Long-Term Incentive Plan, as amended and restated (the “2000 Plan”), the Global Payments Inc. Amended and Restated 2005 Incentive Plan (the “2005 Plan”), an Amended and Restated 2000 Non-Employee Director Stock Option Plan (the “Director Plan”), and the Global Payments Inc. 2011 Incentive Plan (the “2011 Plan”) (collectively, the “Plans”). There were no further grants made under the 2000 Plan after the 2005 Plan was effective and the Director Plan expired by its terms on February 1, 2011 so no further grants will be granted thereunder.

On September 27, 2011, we held our 2011 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (the “Annual Meeting”). At the Annual Meeting, our shareholders approved the 2011 Plan, a plan that permits for grants of equity to employees, officers, directors and consultants. A total of 7.0 million shares of our common stock were reserved and made available for issuance pursuant to awards granted under the 2011 Plan. Effective with the adoption of the 2011 Plan, there will be no future grants under the 2005 Plan.

Certain executives are granted two different types of performance units under our restricted stock program. A portion of those performance units represent the right to earn 0% to 200% of a target number of shares of Global Payments stock depending upon the achievement level of certain performance measures during the grant year (“PRSUs”). The target number of PRSUs and the performance measures (at threshold, target, and maximum) are set by our Compensation Committee. PRSUs are converted to a time-based restricted stock grant only if the Company's performance during the fiscal year exceeds pre-established goals. The other portion of these performance units represent the right to earn 0% to 200% of target shares of Global Payments stock based on Global Payments' relative total shareholder return compared to peer companies over a three year performance period ("TSRs"). The target number of TSRs for each executive is set by our Compensation Committee and a monte carlo simulation is used to calculate the estimated share payout.

The following table summarizes the share-based compensation cost charged to income for (i) all stock options granted, (ii) our restricted stock program (including PRSUs and TSRs), and (iii) our employee stock purchase plan. The total income tax benefit recognized for share-based compensation in the accompanying unaudited statements of income is also presented.
 
Three Months Ended
 
Nine Months Ended
 
February 29, 2012
 
February 28, 2011
 
February 29, 2012
 
February 28, 2011
 
(in millions)
Share-based compensation cost       
$
4.4

 
$
4.1

 
$
12.8

 
$
11.7

Income tax benefit    
$
1.5

 
$
1.5

 
$
4.2

 
$
4.1


Stock Options

Stock options are granted at 100% of fair market value on the date of grant and have 10-year terms. Stock options granted vest one year after the date of grant in 25% increments over a four year period. The Plans provide for accelerated vesting under certain conditions. We have historically issued new shares to satisfy the exercise of options. There were no options granted under the 2005 or 2011 Plans during the nine months ended February 29, 2012.


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The following is a summary of our stock option plans as of and for the nine months ended February 29, 2012:
 
 
 
Options
(in thousands)
 
Weighted Average Exercise Price
 
Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Term
(years)
 
Aggregate Intrinsic Value
(in millions)
Outstanding at May 31, 2011    
 
2,453

 
$
32

 
5.1

 
$
45.9

Granted    
 

 
$

 
 
 
 
Forfeited    
 
(48
)
 
$
40

 
 
 
 
Exercised    
 
(237
)
 
$
32

 
 
 
 
Outstanding at February 29, 2012
 
2,168

 
$
33

 
4.3

 
$
40.1

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Options vested and exercisable at February 29, 2012
 
1,789

 
$
32

 
3.6

 
$
35.7


The aggregate intrinsic value of stock options exercised during the nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011 was $4.0 million and $7.4 million, respectively. As of February 29, 2012, we had $4.9 million of total unrecognized compensation cost related to unvested options which we expect to recognize over a weighted average period of 1.4 years.

The weighted average grant-date fair values of each option granted during the nine months ended February 28, 2011 were $12. The fair value of each option granted was estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes valuation model with the following weighted average assumptions for grants during the period:
 
 
Nine Months Ended
 
 
February 29, 2012
 
February 28, 2011
2005 Plan
 
 
 
 
Risk-free interest rates    
 

 
1.74
%
Expected volatility    
 

 
31.96
%
Dividend yields    
 

 
0.21
%
Expected lives    
 

 
5 years

 
 
 
 
 
Directors Plan
 
 
 
 
Risk-free interest rates
 

 
1.31
%
Expected volatility
 

 
31.96
%
Dividend yields
 

 
0.21
%
Expected lives
 

 
5 years

 

The risk-free interest rate is based on the yield of a zero coupon U.S. Treasury security with a maturity equal to the expected life of the option from the date of the grant. Our assumption on expected volatility is based on our historical volatility. The dividend yield assumption is calculated using our average stock price over the preceding year and the annualized amount of our current quarterly dividend. We based our assumptions on the expected lives of the options on our analysis of the historical exercise patterns of the options and our assumption on the future exercise pattern of options.
 
Restricted Stock

Shares and performance units awarded under the restricted stock program of the 2000 Plan and 2005 Plan are held in escrow and released to the grantee upon the grantee’s satisfaction of conditions of the grantee’s restricted stock agreement. The grant date

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fair value of restricted stock awards is based on the quoted fair market value of our common stock at the award date.

Grants of restricted awards are subject to forfeiture if a grantee, among other conditions, leaves our employment prior to expiration of the restricted period. New grants of restricted awards generally vest one year after the date of grant in 25% increments over a four year period, with the exception of TSRs which vest after a three year period.

The following table summarizes the changes in non-vested restricted stock awards for the nine months ended February 29, 2012.

 
Share
Awards
 
Weighted Average
Grant-Date Fair Value
 
(in thousands)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Non-vested at May 31, 2011            
869

 
$
40

Granted    
467

 
48

Vested    
(318
)
 
40

Forfeited    
(61
)
 
42

Non-vested at February 29, 2012
957

 
44


The total fair value of shares vested during the nine months ended February 29, 2012 was $12.7 million. During the nine months ended February 28, 2011, the weighted average grant-date fair value of shares vested was $42 and the total fair value of shares vested was $10.8 million.

We recognized compensation expense for restricted stock of $3.7 million and $3.2 million in the three months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011, respectively. We recognized compensation expense for restricted stock of $10.7 million and $9.2 million in the nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011, respectively. As of February 29, 2012, there was $33.7 million of total unrecognized compensation cost related to unvested restricted stock awards that is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of 2 years.

Employee Stock Purchase Plan

We have an Employee Stock Purchase Plan under which the sale of 2.4 million shares of our common stock has been authorized. Employees may designate up to the lesser of $25,000 or 20% of their annual compensation for the purchase of stock. The price for shares purchased under the plan is 85% of the market value on the last day of the quarterly purchase period. As of February 29, 2012, 1.0 million shares had been issued under this plan, with 1.4 million shares reserved for future issuance.
 
The weighted average grant-date fair value of each designated share purchased under this plan during the nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011 was $7 and $6, respectively, which represents the fair value of the 15% discount.

NOTE 8—SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOW INFORMATION

Supplemental cash flow disclosures are as follows:

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Nine Months Ended
 
February 29, 2012

February 28, 2011
 
(in thousands)
Income taxes paid, net of refunds    
$
46,112

 
$
36,065

Interest paid    
10,431

 
11,882

Financing receivables:


 


Investment (sale) in equipment for financing leases
$

 
$
(54
)
Principal collections from customers – financing leases    
1,862

 
1,568

Net decrease in financing receivables    
$
1,862

 
$
1,514


NOTE 9—NONCONTROLLING INTERESTS

The following table details the components of redeemable noncontrolling interests for the nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011:

 
Nine Months Ended
 
February 29, 2012
 
February 28, 2011
 
(in thousands)
Beginning balance    
$
133,858

 
$
102,672

Net income attributable to redeemable noncontrolling interest    
9,695

 
8,418

Distributions to redeemable noncontrolling interest
(7,724
)
 

Foreign currency translation adjustment
(815
)
 

Increase in the maximum redemption amount of redeemable noncontrolling interest
6,883

 
15,469

Ending balance    
$
141,897

 
$
126,559


For the nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011, net income included in the consolidated statements of changes in shareholders’ equity is reconciled to net income presented in the consolidated statements of income as follows:

 
Nine Months Ended
 
February 29, 2012
 
February 28, 2011
 
(in thousands)
Net income attributable to Global Payments    
$
183,075

 
$
150,661

Net income attributable to nonredeemable noncontrolling interest    
13,150

 
6,720

Net income attributable to redeemable noncontrolling interest    
9,695

 
8,418

   Net income including noncontrolling interest    
$
205,920

 
$
165,799


NOTE 10—SEGMENT INFORMATION

General information

We operate in two reportable segments, North America Merchant Services and International Merchant Services. The merchant services segments primarily offer processing solutions for credit cards, debit cards, and check-related services.

Information about profit and assets

We evaluate performance and allocate resources based on the operating income of each segment. The operating income of

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each segment includes the revenues of the segment less those expenses that are directly related to those revenues. Operating overhead, shared costs and certain compensation costs are included in Corporate in the following table. Interest expense or income and income tax expense are not allocated to the individual segments. Lastly, we do not evaluate performance or allocate resources using segment asset data. The accounting policies of the reportable segments are the same as those described in the summary of significant accounting policies in Note 1.

Information on segments, including revenues by geographic distribution within segments, and reconciliations to consolidated revenues and consolidated operating income are as follows for the three and nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011:

 
Three Months Ended
 
Nine Months Ended
 
February 29,
2012
 
February 28,
2011
 
February 29,
2012
 
February 28,
2011
 
(in thousands)
Revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   United States
$
302,105

 
$
249,194

 
$
882,946

 
$
750,495

   Canada
76,677

 
81,066

 
253,419

 
243,733

   North America merchant services    
378,782

 
330,260

 
1,136,365

 
994,228

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Europe
116,196

 
90,531

 
360,779

 
244,208

   Asia-Pacific
38,561

 
35,591

 
109,671

 
101,611

International merchant services    
154,757

 
126,122

 
470,450

 
345,819

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Consolidated revenues    
$
533,539

 
$
456,382

 
$
1,606,815

 
$
1,340,047

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating income for segments:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
North America merchant services    
$
62,462

 
$
62,916

 
$
204,893

 
$
198,415

International merchant services    
47,911

 
35,537

 
148,063

 
102,279

Corporate    
(18,025
)
 
(20,254
)
 
(55,419
)
 
(57,244
)
Consolidated operating income    
$
92,348

 
$
78,199

 
$
297,537

 
$
243,450

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
North America merchant services    
$
9,124

 
$
7,961

 
$
26,191

 
$
23,874

International merchant services    
15,212

 
13,336

 
45,091

 
31,626

Corporate    
922

 
494

 
2,215

 
1,019

Consolidated depreciation and amortization    
$
25,258

 
$
21,791

 
$
73,497

 
$
56,519


Our results of operations and our financial condition are not significantly reliant upon any single customer.

NOTE 11—COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

Redeemable Noncontrolling Interest

We have a redeemable noncontrolling interest associated with our Asia-Pacific merchant services business. Global Payments Asia-Pacific, Limited, or GPAP, is the entity through which we conduct our merchant acquiring business in the Asia-Pacific region.  We own 56% of GPAP and HSBC Asia Pacific owns the remaining 44%.  The GPAP shareholders agreement includes provisions pursuant to which HSBC Asia Pacific may compel us to purchase, at the lesser of fair value or a net revenue multiple, additional GPAP shares from HSBC Asia Pacific (the “Put Option”).  HSBC Asia Pacific may exercise the Put Option on each anniversary of

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the closing of the acquisition. HSBC Asia Pacific did not exercise the Put Option on the first exercisable date of July 24, 2011. By exercising the Put Option, HSBC Asia Pacific can require us to purchase, on an annual basis, up to 15% of the total issued shares of GPAP.  We estimate the maximum total redemption amount of the redeemable noncontrolling interest under the Put Option would be $141.9 million as of February 29, 2012, $45.6 million of which was puttable to us on July 24, 2011. We have adjusted our redeemable noncontrolling interest to reflect the maximum redemption amount as of February 29, 2012 on our consolidated balance sheet.

Processing System Intrusion

Subsequent to February 29, 2012, we announced an unauthorized access into our processing system. We immediately launched an investigation to prevent further intrusion, mitigate the impact of the unauthorized access and identify the perpetrators. We promptly notified appropriate federal law enforcement and industry parties to allow them to minimize potential cardholder impact. We believe that the affected portion of our processing system is confined to North America and less than 1,500,000 card numbers may have been exported. The investigation to date has revealed that Track 2 card data may have been stolen, but that cardholder names, addresses and social security numbers were not obtained by the criminals. Based on our forensic analysis to date, network monitoring and additional security measures, we believe that this incident is contained. We continue to work with industry third parties, regulators and law enforcement. We have engaged multiple information security and forensics firms to investigate and address this issue.

Based on our public disclosure that card data may have been accessed, we have been advised by Visa that Visa has removed us from Visa's published list of PCI-DSS compliant service providers until we are able to provide to Visa either a forensic report indicating that we remain PCI DSS compliant or a PCI DSS Report on Compliance and Attestation of Compliance from a Qualified Security Assessor highlighting us as PCI DSS compliant. We must complete our forensic investigation and provide our report to Visa before we can revalidate our PCI DSS compliance.

Because we are in the early stages of our investigation, we cannot reasonably estimate the amount or range of any potential losses related to this incident. Accordingly, we have not accrued any losses associated with this matter. If we determine, as more information becomes available, that it is probable that we have incurred losses and we can reasonably estimate those losses, we will accrue such losses in the period in which we make those determinations. Any such losses could be material and may adversely impact our results of operations. Subsequent to February 29, 2012, we have incurred costs associated with the investigation and remediation of this incident, and we are expensing those costs as they are incurred in accordance with our accounting policy for such costs. We have insurance that we believe may cover certain costs and losses associated with this matter, but we have not yet confirmed the extent of such coverage.



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Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

For an understanding of the significant factors that influenced our results, the following discussion should be read in conjunction with our unaudited consolidated financial statements and related notes appearing elsewhere in this report. This management’s discussion and analysis should also be read in conjunction with the management’s discussion and analysis and consolidated financial statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended May 31, 2011.

General
 
We are a provider of electronic payments transaction processing services for consumers, merchants, Independent Sales Organizations (ISOs), financial institutions, government agencies and multi-national corporations located throughout the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Spain, the Asia-Pacific region, the Czech Republic and the Russian Federation. We serve as an intermediary to facilitate payments transactions and operate in two business segments, North America Merchant Services and International Merchant Services. We were incorporated in Georgia as Global Payments Inc. in September 2000 and spun-off from our former parent company on January 31, 2001. Including our time as part of our former parent company, we have been in business since 1967.

Our North America Merchant Services and International Merchant Services segments target customers in many vertical industries including financial institutions, gaming, government, health care, professional services, restaurants, retail, universities, nonprofit organizations and utilities.

Our offerings provide merchants, ISOs and financial institutions with credit and debit card transaction processing and check-related services. The majority of our business model provides payment products and services directly to merchants as our end customers. We also provide similar products and services to financial institutions and a limited number of ISOs that, in turn, resell our products and services, in which case, the financial institutions and select ISOs are our end customers. These particular services are marketed in the United States, Canada, and parts of Eastern Europe.

The majority of merchant services revenue is generated on services priced as a percentage of transaction value or a specified fee per transaction, depending on card type. We also charge other fees based on specific services that are unrelated to the number of transactions or the transaction value. Revenue from credit cards and signature debit cards, which are only a U.S. based card type, is generally based on a percentage of transaction value along with other related fees, while revenue from PIN debit cards is typically based on a fee per transaction.

Our products and services are marketed through a variety of sales channels that include a dedicated direct sales force, ISOs, an internal telesales group, retail outlets, trade associations, alliance bank relationships and financial institutions. We seek to leverage the continued shift to electronic payments by expanding market share in our existing markets through our distribution channels or through acquisitions in North America, the Asia-Pacific region and Europe, and investing in and leveraging technology and people, thereby maximizing shareholder value. We also seek to enter new markets through acquisitions in the Asia-Pacific region, Europe, and Latin America.

Our business does not have pronounced seasonality in which more than 30% of our revenues occur in one quarter. However, each geographic channel has somewhat higher and lower quarters given the nature of the portfolio. While there is some variation in seasonality across markets, the first and fourth quarters are generally the strongest, and the third quarter tends to be the slowest due to lower volumes in the months of January and February.

Executive Overview

Revenues increased $266.8 million, or 20%, during the nine months ended February 29, 2012 compared to the prior year’s comparable period. Revenue growth was driven by strong performance across certain of our regions, and the impact of our acquisition in Spain on December 20, 2010.

Operating income increased $54.1 million during the nine months ended February 29, 2012 compared to the prior year’s comparable period. Operating margins for the nine months ended February 29, 2012 increased to 18.5% compared to 18.2% during the nine months ended February 28, 2011. The increase in operating margin is primarily due to strong results in our International

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merchant services segment, partially offset by the margin dilutive effect of our U.S. ISO channel.

For the nine months ended February 29, 2012 currency exchange rate fluctuations increased our revenues by $11.5million and our earnings by $0.04 per diluted share. To calculate this impact, we converted our fiscal 2012 actual revenues and expenses from continuing operations at fiscal 2011 currency exchange rates. Further fluctuations in currency exchange rates or decreases in consumer spending could cause our results to differ from our current expectations.

During our third fiscal quarter we completed three acquisitions which expand our International and e-commerce presence. In December 2011, our UCS subsidiary acquired Alfa-Bank's merchant acquiring business. Alfa-Bank is the largest privately owned bank in Russia. In December 2011, we also acquired a merchant acquiring business in Malta and in January 2012 acquired a U.S. e-commerce portfolio. The aggregate purchase price for these three transactions was approximately $44 million.

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Results of Operations

The following table shows key selected financial data for the three months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011, this data as a percentage of total revenue, and the changes between three months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011, in dollars and as a percentage of the prior year’s comparable period. Comercia's results of operations are included in our consolidated results of operations and results of operations of our International merchant services segment from December 20, 2010, the date we acquired our controlling financial interest.
 
Three Months Ended February 29, 2012
 
% of Revenue(1)
 
Three Months Ended February 28, 2011
 
% of Revenue(1)
 
Change
 
% Change
 
(dollar amounts in thousands)
Revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
United States
$
302,105

 
57

 
$
249,194

 
55

 
$
52,911

 
21

Canada
76,677

 
14

 
81,066

 
18

 
(4,389
)
 
(5
)
    North America merchant services
378,782

 
71

 
330,260

 
72

 
48,522

 
15

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Europe
116,196

 
22

 
90,531

 
20

 
25,665

 
28

Asia-Pacific
38,561

 
7

 
35,591

 
8

 
2,970

 
8

    International merchant services
154,757

 
29

 
126,122

 
28

 
28,635

 
23

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
          Total revenues
$
533,539

 
100

 
$
456,382

 
100

 
$
77,157

 
17

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Consolidated operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of service
$
194,218

 
36.4

 
$
168,332

 
36.9

 
$
25,886

 
15

Sales, general and administrative
246,973

 
46.3

 
209,851

 
46.0

 
37,122

 
18

     Operating income
$
92,348

 
17.3

 
$
78,199

 
17.1

 
$
14,149

 
18

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating income for segments:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
North America merchant services
$
62,462

 
 
 
$
62,916

 
 
 
$
(454
)
 
(1
)
International merchant services
47,911

 
 
 
35,537

 
 
 
12,374

 
35

Corporate
(18,025
)
 
 
 
(20,254
)
 
 
 
2,229

 
11

     Operating income
$
92,348

 
 
 
$
78,199

 
 
 
$
14,149

 
18

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating margin for segments:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
North America merchant services
16.5
%
 
 
 
19.1
%
 
 
 
(2.6
)%
 
 
International merchant services
31.0
%
 
 
 
28.2
%
 
 
 
2.8
 %
 
 
(1) Percentage amounts may not sum to the total due to rounding.


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The following table shows key selected financial data for the nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011, this data as a percentage of total revenue, and the changes between nine months ended February 29, 2012 and February 28, 2011, in dollars and as a percentage of the prior year’s comparable period. Comercia's results of operations are included in our consolidated results of operations and results of operations of our International merchant services segment from December 20, 2010, the date we acquired our controlling financial interest. Accordingly, results of operations for the nine months ended February 29, 2012 reflect the results of Comercia's operations, while results of operations for seven of the nine months ended February 28, 2011 do not reflect these results for the entire prior year.
 
Nine Months Ended February 29, 2012
 
% of Revenue(1)
 
Nine Months Ended February 28, 2011
 
% of Revenue(1)
 
Change
 
% Change
 
(dollar amounts in thousands)
Revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
United States
$
882,946

 
55

 
$
750,495

 
56

 
$
132,451

 
18

Canada
253,419

 
16

 
243,733

 
18

 
9,686

 
4

    North America merchant services
1,136,365

 
71

 
994,228

 
74

 
142,137

 
14

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Europe
360,779

 
22

 
244,208

 
18

 
116,571

 
48

Asia-Pacific
109,671

 
7

 
101,611

 
8

 
8,060

 
8

    International merchant services
470,450

 
29

 
345,819

 
26

 
124,631

 
36

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
          Total revenues
$
1,606,815

 
100

 
$
1,340,047

 
100

 
$
266,768